Torquay

A Buried Torbay

There's an idea in archaeology and history called a palimpsest. It comes from a parchment manuscript page. These were originally made of lamb, calf, or goat kid skin and were expensive, so they were …

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The Vikings come second in Torbay

The Anglo Saxon Chronicle records that in the year 850AD:“Here Ealdorman Ceorl with Devonshire fought against the heathen men at Wicga’s stronghold and made a great slaughter there and took the victor…

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The Devil at Daddyhole

Above the natural arch of London Bridge is the limestone plateau of Daddyhole Plain. Unlike London Bridge, which was named probably in the mid eighteenth century, the name Daddyhole is far more an…

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Echoes from a Torquay Churchyard

By Margaret Forbes-Hamilton & Kevin Dixon Just off Torquay’s Lucius Street stands the Greek Orthodox Church of St. Andrew. The church is on the site of one of the oldest settlements of what …

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View and Non View: a Torquay Future

In 1954 the author Nancy Mitford wrote an essay, ‘The English Aristocracy’ for the magazine Encounter. She provided a list of terms used by the upper classes which caused a national debate about E…

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Torquay’s Troublesome Navvies

A railway station serving Torquay was opened on 18 December 1848, but this station was far from the harbour at the centre of town. This wouldn’t do and a new station near Abbey Sands was opened on…

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The Torquay Commemorative Stamps

On September 18, 1961, Torquay was the proud host of the Second European Postal and Telecommunications (CEPT) Conference. Fair enough, this doesn't sound too exciting or, let's face it, even remot…